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Moonwise: HC 23-24, PB 13-15 - Input Junkie
November 1st, 2012
12:36 am

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Moonwise: HC 23-24, PB 13-15
There's a new section called 0:Hallows. The other sections are sequentially numbered with roman numerals.

From The Word Hoard: Hallows: All Hallows Day, when Annis wakes and hunts souls. November 1 or Samhain, depending on which calendar one uses. Hallow means holy or sacred; but to hallow is to chase with shouts or even to rouse to action with a sharp cry.

So I wasn't procrastinating on doing this update. I was waiting for the appropriate day.

"He walked in the Cloudwood that they were to fell, had felled long since...." Time is strange here, which could explain the out-of-sequence numbering.

"And wandering, he pulled and plucked the hazelnuts, the brown and starry beechmast, ash-keys, acorns, letting fall as many as he took, so many hung and ripened, fell and leamed among the leafdrift, far and farther still." Anyone know about the starry beechmast? A reference to the boat with a tree for a mast? I was wondering if beech leaves were star-shaped like maple leaves, but they aren't. Also, what does leamed mean?

"Birds sang, but flurried, shrill, it being fall of the year. They waked; and through the branches of the trees, the wind spilled leaves of light and shadow, leaves of dust, like the souls of all the birds since Eve." The birds and their shadows (possibly also the shadows of the leaves) are part of the echoes and shadowing in this chapter.

"All afternoon he lay beside the water, and watched the leaves rising from the dark to touch their falling shadows from the air, bright, haily. Being still where leaf and its foretelling image met, he did not know if he rose or fell through time." More doubling. I don't know what 'haily' means.

And he got his coat from a scarecrow, but he's like a scarecrow himself.

"Times changed, as time did not. They who had slain children in the fields, sowing blood with corn, hung garlands; still the seeds grew tall and winter died. Come wakenight, they stoned the wren, poor Jenny Knap, and hanged it in a crown of green, with rimes; they fired thorn, kept lightfast and langnight, so the sun would turn. They danced the years and died."

That last sentence is one of the very good ones.

Wren Day is on December 26, but the unnamed man is trapped in the fall. He's got a very bad sort of immortality. I'm also hearing a little echo of Lewis' "Always winter and never Christmas."

"Once, from the nuts he had gathered had sprung a hazel tree, and branched from his side, and borne and withered, in the space of a dream." The Celts believed hazelnuts gave one wisdom and inspiration. The man is just trying to survive, he's not learning anything trapped in autumn in the Cloudwoods, and perhaps it's not a coincidence that he sleeps through the life of a hazel tree. Sources from google give answers for the lifespan of a hazel tree of 20 years from one place and 70-80 years from another-- and just as well really, this isn't the place for precise world-building.

"The cup turned all to shadows. Lying by the water now, held it, wood and handworn. Fitted hand, he thought: his own and other's. Lad at given it were lightborn. Last. Not see'd him sin, nor any face i'Cloud."

Here's my guess at the meaning of the second half of the paragraph. "The lad that gave it was of fairy. (I have no idea what "Last" means in this case.) Haven't seen him since, nor anyone in Cloud."

This entry was posted at http://nancylebov.dreamwidth.org/995098.html. Comments are welcome here or there. comment count unavailable comments so far on that entry.

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[User Picture]
From:elenbarathi
Date:November 1st, 2012 05:32 am (UTC)
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Oh wow, I really like this!
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From:elenbarathi
Date:November 1st, 2012 05:37 am (UTC)
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Ah - as to the "brown and starry beechmast", it really does look kind of starry - there are some good pictures at http://www.hainaultforest.co.uk/5Beech.htm
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From:thnidu
Date:November 1st, 2012 07:54 am (UTC)
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See multiple comment on DW. ... Ah, elenbarathi, we found the same source for "brown and starry beechmast"!
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From:elenbarathi
Date:November 1st, 2012 11:57 am (UTC)
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Yay, "great minds", right? ^^

There's a beech wood I knew long ago, at Highbanks MetroPark in Columbus OH - I was hoping to find an image of brown and starry beechmast there, but no go.
[User Picture]
From:thnidu
Date:November 1st, 2012 07:58 am (UTC)
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A last sudden thought.

"Birds sang, but flurried, shrill, it being fall of the year. They waked; and through the branches of the trees, the wind spilled leaves of light and shadow, leaves of dust, like the souls of all the birds since Eve."
They waked, did they? As in holding a wake for the dying year?

Edited at 2012-11-01 07:58 am (UTC)
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From:nancylebov
Date:November 1st, 2012 03:18 pm (UTC)
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From the wordhoard:
waking: An essential pun here, both arising from sleep and mourning the day. Waking wood means both to bring the wood to consciousness and (because “wood” also means “mad”) waking up insane. Gilman explains: “Tom a’ Cloud was told to ‘wake wood.’That is, to rouse himself, to rise up mad. Another essential pun. To wake wood is to call from sleep the Wood Above, the Unleaving: the pack of tales that is Cloud. It is also to keep watch, to shepherd it; and also to mourn its passing. His dream is this world.”

So, wake can mean mourn, which makes more sense than holding a wake-- that would be after the death of the year.
[User Picture]
From:thnidu
Date:November 2nd, 2012 04:35 am (UTC)
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Ah, thank'ee.
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From:solri
Date:November 1st, 2012 06:20 pm (UTC)
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I loved "They danced the years and died." Not sure about "i'Cloud" though - sounds like an Apple product for distributed computing.
[User Picture]
From:nancylebov
Date:November 1st, 2012 06:32 pm (UTC)
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The book came out in 1991. I'm reasonably sure the use of 'cloud' for letting someone else's computer do the storage is more recent. That being said, we could have a gay old time thinking about how contemporary usage reaches back into the past.

"The World Inside the Crystal" by Kathy Mar, a fantasy take on computers.
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From:vr_trakowski
Date:November 1st, 2012 11:47 pm (UTC)
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I believe it's short for "in Cloud".

Mast: "The fruit of forest-trees (beech, oak, chestnut, pecan, etc.), especially if having fallen from the tree, used as fodder for pigs and other animals."
[User Picture]
From:nancylebov
Date:November 2nd, 2012 09:57 pm (UTC)
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That makes sense-- the other items in the list are the nuts, not the trees.
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From:thnidu
Date:November 2nd, 2012 04:35 am (UTC)

PB p.15

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I'd rather use the community model for this group reading, but I don't see much comment on the DW community, so I'll be posting my observations as comments here.

P15¶2 is rich!. (If the page starts with a paragraph continued from the page before, I number that one zero. This is the paragraph after the break in the text, starting "The world was naked now.")

twelve winds:
My first thought was of Le Guin's collection The Wind's Twelve Quarters, which I've always associated with A. E. Housman's "A Shropshire Lad":
XXXII.

From far, from eve and morning
   And yon twelve-winded sky,
The stuff of life to knit me
    Blew hither: here am I.

Now—for a breath I tarry*
    Nor yet disperse apart—
Take my hand quick and tell me,
    What have you in your heart.

Speak now, and I will answer;
    How shall I help you, say;
Ere to the wind’s twelve quarters
    I take my endless way.
* (Zelazny, too!)

But where did Housman get it from? Here's WP (Wikipedia):
Classical compass winds refers to the naming and association of winds in Mediterranean classical antiquity (Ancient Greece and Rome) with the points of geographic direction and orientation. Ancient wind roses typically had twelve winds and thus twelve points of orientation – sometimes reduced to eight or increased to twenty-four.


he saw the sheep driven to fold, keeled and curded like froth on the ale-brown moor. Lambswool. Eh, but he were mortal dry.

keel
v.4: To mark with ruddle.
1886   C. Scott Pract. Sheep-farming 151   The sale ewe lambs in hill flocks are also keeled on the neck to distinguish them from the wether lambs. (OED [Oxford English Dictionary])

ruddle: A red pigment consisting of a variety of ochre, used esp. for marking sheep (OED)

curd: I couldn't find any other meaning than the one we use today, a milk product. But AHD4 (Amer.Heritage Dict., 4th ed.) notes in the etymology: "Middle English ... probably akin to crowden, to press. See crowd."

So: he's very thirsty, and the red-flecked, crowded woolly turmoil he sees below him on the brown moor makes him think of ale.

(Mazes again. And wire: this moment, at least, is no ancient view.)

haled: Winter haled him.
Not "hale" = healthy, nor related to "hail(y)", but "to compel to go". (AHD4)


a can of half-bright tin, clagged and rusting: poor stuff, but hawded water; it 'ud do to seethe in.

clagged:
clag. Chiefly northern dialect. To bedaub (the clothes), clot (the hair) with anything sticky and tenacious, as miry clay, glue, toffee, etc.
a1530   W. Bonde Pylgrimage of Perfection (1531) iii. f. Cxl,   We come to the gates all clagged with myre & clay.
1881   E. Sutton N. Lincs. Gloss.,   Clagged, clotted with dirt.
1886   R. E. G. Cole Gloss. Words S.-W. Lincolnshire,   Clag, to daub, or clog together with sticky mud or clay.

hawded: held; hawd = hold
'ud: would. For that matter, how different is "It 'ud do" from "It'd do", other than the writing of it?
seethe: to boil

miry: Coming over Cloudlaw in the miry dusk
Swampy, or smeared with mud. (AHD4) And look back up at the OED's definition of "clag".

[User Picture]
From:nancylebov
Date:November 2nd, 2012 04:56 am (UTC)

Re: PB p.15

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I'd rather use the community model at LJ, too, but if I understood matters correctly, if I wanted a community at LJ, I'd either have to pay for another membership or have ads on it.

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From:harvey_rrit
Date:November 2nd, 2012 08:27 pm (UTC)

Re: PB p.15

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I think "mast" is used in the sense of "food". It's the nuts.
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From:nancylebov
Date:November 2nd, 2012 09:57 pm (UTC)

Re: PB p.15

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I think you're right.
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From:thnidu
Date:November 3rd, 2012 05:51 am (UTC)

Re: PB p.15

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Oh, I understand, and I'm not complaining, just explaining.
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From:thnidu
Date:November 3rd, 2012 05:54 am (UTC)

Please tag

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Please tag this post "reading_moonwise" like the others. It makes it much easier to navigate between them. Thanks.
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From:thnidu
Date:November 3rd, 2012 06:45 am (UTC)

ketchup: PB p3

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Well, catching up, anyway.

PB p3¶4: A wind in the door blew it open.
What, nephew, said the king, is the wind in that door?
-- Malory, Morte d'Arthur, Book 7, Ch.34
What, Malory, does that mean?! I can't make any sense of it at all in context (about 2/3 down the first paragraph there)... unless, maybe, it was an idiom, meaning something like "What's the relevance of that?" None of which helps in figuring out why Madeleine L'Engle used it as epigraph and title source for the second book in her Time Quintet, A Wind In the Door.

The first book in the Quintet, A Wrinkle in Time, is 50 years old this year! Oy. And it has just come out as a graphic novel illustrated by Hope Larson, which I have added to my Amazon.com wish list.
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From:nancylebov
Date:November 3rd, 2012 03:06 pm (UTC)

Re: ketchup: PB p3

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Purest guesswork for turning the Malory quote into an idiom: wind in the door is air coming out of a speaker's mouth: Arthur is saying, "Gareth, why are you going on so long about something obvious?".

I liked L'Engle's A Wind in the Door, but I don't remember if the title had anything to do with the novel.

Edited at 2012-11-03 05:51 pm (UTC)
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