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Music for Halloween - Input Junkie
October 31st, 2015
11:18 am

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Music for Halloween
I've been thinking that it would be suitable to have music where the composer and all the performers are dead. This is easy enough to find for a solo performance, but more challenging for groups and definitely harder for orchestras. Suggestions?

Also a pagan collection with no obligation for anyone to be dead.

Good collections of secular music for Halloween?

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From:bugsybanana
Date:October 31st, 2015 03:40 pm (UTC)
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If you're not fussy about acoustics, anything from the acoustic era (before 1925, when electrical recording technology - microphones, etc. - came into use) should have entirely deceased personnel.

I can't verify it with my quick search, but I'd bet all the members of the original Raymond Scott Quintette are now dead.
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From:kalimac
Date:October 31st, 2015 04:03 pm (UTC)
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The composer is dead (by only 17 years) but the performers aren't, but this which I posted two years ago is one of my favorite pieces of Halloween music.

Here (without the visuals, unfortunately: all the ones I could find online use a newer substitute performance) is the original Stokowski version of Night on Bald Mountain from Fantasia: since this was recorded 75 years ago I'm sure all the performers are gone by now.

Edited at 2015-10-31 04:03 pm (UTC)
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From:madfilkentist
Date:October 31st, 2015 04:32 pm (UTC)
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I wouldn't count on it. Orchestra members could have been as young as 20, and could still be alive at 95.

But Night on Bald Mountain is excellent Halloween music anyway.

Edited at 2015-10-31 04:32 pm (UTC)
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From:elenbarathi
Date:October 31st, 2015 06:35 pm (UTC)
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Danse Macabre by Camille Saint-Saens, first performed in 1875. This filmstrip was made in 1963; I saw it in 1967:



.... the tempo kinda drags on that version, though. Here's my favorite, Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra. I hope they're all still alive.



Edited at 2015-10-31 06:56 pm (UTC)
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