November 23rd, 2006

What color is this picture?

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061016.html

which is Saturn's eclipse of the sun, as seen by the Cassini probe. It's shades of purple on my monitor, but prints out in shades of teal. What color does it look like to you?

My printer won't work if I'm out of an ink color, so lacking blue or red can't be the explanation.

I just tried printing the Christmas products from the Purple Store, and they came out purple.

It doesn't matter--the eclipse is an exaggerated color image anyway, but I've never seen my printer show just a strong aesthetic preference.

Update: My printer is a Canon S750. Would anyone care to try printing it? Have any of you had your printer completely change the color of an image rather than just doing a somewhat wimpy or off shade?

I don't have to single out a book, I wanna single out a person

Inspired by
If you had to single out one book as having done the most damage to F&SF, which one would you pick?
, I'm nominating Roger Elwood as the person who did the most damage to the field. He produced a huge number of mediocre (except that they had Lafferty stories) original anthologies, and the non-theme original anthology market hasn't recovered even though it's been decades.

In the original thread, a number of people nominated _Atlas Shrugged_ as the most damaging book, but I can't see much influence from it. What am I missing?

Continuing the argument

I'm still not seeing all this libertarian science fiction that was influenced by _Atlas Shrugged_, though admittedly I quit reading Analog a long time ago. There's L. Neil Smith, but who else? I'm told that the last volume of Wright's Golden Age trilogy has a lot of objectivist content, but that's just one book.

I suspect that _Atlas Shrugged_ got nominated as most damaging book because a lot of people hate it, not because it actually had a noticable effect on the genre.

No one else thinks Elwood made any difference?

james_nicoll had a point when he titled the original thread "For the fairest".