nancylebov (nancylebov) wrote,
nancylebov
nancylebov

A copy of Atlas Shrugged in every room

http://www.freestarmedia.com/hotellostliberty2.html
Could a hotel be built on the land owned by Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter? A new ruling by the Supreme Court which was supported by Justice Souter himself itself might allow it. A private developer is seeking to use this very law to build a hotel on Souter's land.

Justice Souter's vote in the "Kelo vs. City of New London" decision allows city governments to take land from one private owner and give it to another if the government will generate greater tax revenue or other economic benefits when the land is developed by the new owner.

On Monday June 27, Logan Darrow Clements, faxed a request to Chip Meany the code enforcement officer of the Towne of Weare, New Hampshire seeking to start the application process to build a hotel on 34 Cilley Hill Road. This is the present location of Mr. Souter's home.

Clements, CEO of Freestar Media, LLC, points out that the City of Weare will certainly gain greater tax revenue and economic benefits with a hotel on 34 Cilley Hill Road than allowing Mr. Souter to own the land.

The proposed development, called "The Lost Liberty Hotel" will feature the "Just Desserts Café" and include a museum, open to the public, featuring a permanent exhibit on the loss of freedom in America. Instead of a Gideon's Bible each guest will receive a free copy of Ayn Rand's novel "Atlas Shrugged."

Clements indicated that the hotel must be built on this particular piece of land because it is a unique site being the home of someone largely responsible for destroying property rights for all Americans.


This is a much better idea than my initial notion of fire-bombing, and as they say about life imprisonment vs. capital punishment--it's much slower.

However, not everyone wants a copy of Atlas Shrugged. Fortunately, there are 5 more Justices who presumably own houses.

There should be a hotel with G.K. Chesterton books in every room. The Napoleon of Notting Hill would probably be best. This book would also appeal to gamers, I think, but to say more would be a spoiler.

And maybe one with The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy for the sake of the hyperspatial bypass, though at least that could be reasonably considered a public work. Actually, so could the water tower(?) in the Chesterton novel.

OK, one traditionalist/syndicalist hotel--that's the one that serves Sauce for the Goose in the restaurant, and one science fiction hotel. And we've *still* got 3 justices to go. Any suggestions?
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